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Discussion and Conclusion

An initial goal of the Java Grande Message Passing working group was to promote a standardized MPI binding for Java. It became apparent that this road was likely to produce a collision of interest with the existing MPI community, and the name of the new API was changed to MPJ. MPJ was designated an ``MPI-like'' specification. The current specification is available in [5]. This specification is essentially complete and self-contained, but as discussed in section 4, it is not necessarily considered ``final''.

Because the proposed API was designed on object-oriented principles, most of the original MPI specification actually maps very naturally into Java. So long as one accepts the Java Grande premise that Java is an excellent basis for technical computing, an MPI-like approach to parallel computing seems very promising--more promising than some have assumed. But there remain non-obvious issues about supporting basic MPI functionality. Some of the more difficult ones boil down to the lack of a good model of scientific arrays in Java. This issue is somewhat outside the purview of this working group, but is being actively discussed by the Java Grande Numerics working group [11].

Reference implementations of the MPJ specification are currently (March, 2000) under development. An implementation based on JNI wrappers to native MPI will be created by adapting the mpiJava wrappers [3]. While this is a good approach in some situations, it has various disadvantages and conflicts with the ethos of Java, where pure-Java, write-once-run-anywhere software is the order of the day. A design for a pure-Java reference implementation of MPJ has also been outlined [2]. In this case, design goals were that the system should be as easy to install on distributed systems as we can reasonably make it, and that it be sufficiently robust to be usable in an Internet environment.

Back in 1994, MPI-1 was originally designed with relatively static platforms in mind. To better support computing in volatile Internet environments, modern message passing designs for Java will have to support (at least) features such as dynamic spawning of process groups and parallel client/server interfaces as introduced in the MPI-2 specification. In addition, a natural framework for dynamically discovering new compute resources and establishing connections between running programs already exists in Sun's Jini project [1], and one line of investigation is into MPJ implementations operating in the Jini framework.

Closely modelled as it is on the MPI standards, the existing MPJ specification should be regarded as a first phase in a broader program to define a more Java-centric high performance message-passing environment. In future a detachment from legacy implementations involving Java on top of native methods will be emphasized. We should consider the possibility of layering the messaging middleware over standard transports and other Java-compliant middleware (like CORBA). In a sense, the middleware developed at this level should offer a choice of emphasis between performance or generality, while always supporting portability. We note an opportunity to study and standardize aspects of real-time and fault-aware programs, drawing on the concepts learned in the MPI/RT activity [14]. For performance, we should seek to take advantage of what has been learned since MPI-1 and MPI-2 were finalized, or ignored in MPI standardization for various reasons--for instance drawing on the body of knowledge completed within the MPI/RT Forum. From here we may at least glean design hints concerning channel abstractions, and the more direct use of object-oriented design for message passing than was seen in MPI-1 or MPI-2. The value of this type of messaging middleware in the embedded and real-time Java application spaces should also be considered.

Of course, a primary goal in the above mentioned, both current and future work, should be the aim to offer MPI-like services to Java programs in an upward compatible fashion. The purposes are twofold: performance and portability.


next up previous
Next: Acknowledgements Up: MPJ: MPI-like Message Passing Previous: Other issues
Bryan Carpenter 2004-04-24